Things tagged 'consultation'

limited to the area of Newham Cyclists:

30 issues found for 'consultation':

  • Tower Hamlets Transport Strategy 2019-2041

    Created by Alex Jenkins // 2 threads

    The draft Tower Hamlets Transport Strategy aims to improve the way we move around our borough.

    Tower Hamlets is one of the country's fastest growing boroughs. Our roads are the busiest in the UK.

    77 per cent of our residents are exposed to unsafe pollution levels, children in the borough have on average up to ten per cent less lung capacity and 43 per cent of Year 6 school children are overweight or obese.

    According to Public Health England, pollution is linked to increasing rates of asthma, heart disease, dementia, lung cancer and low birth weight.

    The new strategy aims to address these concerns and look at what the council and residents can do to make travel cleaner, safer and accessible for everyone. 

    Promoting walking and cycling is at the heart of plans to help meet the Mayor of London’s target that 90 per cent of all trips in the borough should be made on foot, by cycle or by using public transport by 2041.

    Over the next two months, the council will be asking all those who live and work in the borough to get involved, share their ideas and help shape the future of travel in Tower Hamlets.

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  • Ilford - Barking Riverside Cycleway

    Created by Simon Munk // 6 threads

    This 7km route will link Ilford to Barking Riverside via Barking town centre using mostly quieter back streets. It would include key connections to the cycle route between Barking and Tower Gateway, Ilford Elizabeth line station and Barking Riverside Development - this includes more than 10,000 new homes and a new London Overground station.

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  • Liveable Streets Bow Trial engagement

    Created by Alex Jenkins // 1 thread

    Following recent engagement on the Liveable Streets programme in the Bow area, we are planning to trial some changes to the road layout. These changes are based on suggestions made by local residents and stakeholders.

    This trial will help us understand the effects these changes have on the road network and allow residents and businesses to experience the positive impact reduced traffic has on the local area.

    During the trial we will be running several events and activities to take advantage of the reduced number of motor vehicles passing through the Bow area, and encourage local journeys to be made by sustainable modes such as walking and cycling. Keep an eye out for more information on these.

    Please note that as a part of our preparation for the trial we have consulted with the emergency services, bus operators and Transport for London to ensure they can deliver their services using the changed road layout.

    https://www.pclconsult.co.uk/bowtrial/

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  • Liveable Streets Barkantine engagement

    Created by Alex Jenkins // 1 thread

    Our Liveable Streets programme will improve the look and feel of public spaces in your neighbourhood. By creating a better environment, we can make it more convenient to get around by foot, bike and public transport.

    From creating new green spaces to rethinking how our streets work, we want your creative ideas, thoughts and feedback.

    Tell us what matters to you by completing our online survey towards the bottom of this page. You can also plot your ideas on the interactive map below.

    Please talk to your neighbours, friends and family and encourage them to take part.

    https://www.pclconsult.co.uk/liveablestreetsbarkantine/

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  • Chrisp Street Corridor

    Created by Alex Jenkins // 1 thread

    Tower Hamlets Council is committed to making the borough a safer place for all road users by delivering a range of street improvements in the area; intending to benefit pedestrians, cyclists, drivers and public transport users alike.

    Influencing positive changes in road user behaviour is key in providing a safe road environment for the community and although changes in road layout can’t fully resolve this, redesign of our streets can help. Therefore, Chrisp Street and the surrounding areas are currently being invested in with aims to improve road safety for the local community.

    Please give us your feedback by filling in the survey (below the map). You may also like to add a comment to our interactive map of the wider area.

    https://www.pclconsult.co.uk/chrispstreet/

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  • Madison Square Garden (MSG) Sphere Planning Application

    Created by jrothwell // 2 threads

    The Madison Square Garden Company proposes to build a new entertainment venue, "the MSG Sphere", adjacent to Angel Lane and Montfichet Road in the Olympic Park.

    They have proposed a two-way cycle track at pavement level on Montfichet Road past Westfield, and to narrow the carriageway on Angel Lane (removing the current advisory cycle lane.) A small amount of visitor cycle parking is proposed.

    From LLDC's planning page:

    In March 2019, the Planning Policy and Decisions Team received a planning application for a large-scale live music and entertainment venue from The Madison Square Garden Company (MSG). The proposal is for a spherical shaped building next to Stratford Station that would provide an auditorium (capacity for up to 21,500 people), a music venue, nightclub, members lounge, restaurants, bars, and new bridges to create pedestrian connections across the site amongst other things.

    The building is a first for London because externally the spherical building would be composed of a ‘skin’ of LED’s. These LED’s would be programmable and could display images on the surface of the building including adverts.

    Application Documents 

    A detailed planning application and has been submitted which comprises a number of plans, drawings and documents that can be viewed on our website. An advertisement consent has also been submitted which comprises a number of plans and a design statement which is also available on our website.

    Both applications can all be viewed via the Planning Application Register, using the following reference numbers:

    • Full Planning Application: 19/00097/FUL
    • Advertisement Consent Application: 19/00098/ADV

    How can I comment 

    If you have any comments about the MSG Sphere proposal, please write to the Planning Policy and Decisions Team by Friday 28 June 2019. Comments must be submitted in writing via email or post:

     

    Email:   planningenquiries@londonlegacy.co.uk; or

    Post:  Planning Policy and Decisions Team
    London Legacy Development Corporation
    Level 10
    1 Stratford Place
    Montfichet Road
    London
    E20 1EJ

     

    Public Consultation

     

    The Planning Policy and Decision Team will be hosting a public consultation event where you can share your thoughts and learn more about the proposal and planning application process.

     

    The consultation event will take place on 5 June 2019 (4.00PM – 8.30PM) at: ST PAUL AND ST JAMES CHURCH, 65 MARYLAND RD, E15 1JL (Venue details and directions are available via the following link - https://www.achurchnearyou.com/church/6629/find-us/).

     
    The event will broadly be structured as follows:

    • 4.00PM – 6.00PM – Drop-in and talk to a representative of the LLDC planning team
    • 6.30PM – 8.30PM – Presentation, Question and Answer session followed by Group Discussions

    If you have any questions or special requirements please contact us at: planningenquiries@londonlegacy.co.uk.

     

    Planning Committee

     

    The planning application will be determined by the LLDC Planning Decision Committee, after the Planning Policy Decisions Team have reviewed the submission and all written responses received during the consultation period. No date is currently set and it is considered that the earliest this could take place is Winter 2019. This page will be updated in due course once the date for Committee is known.

    Planning Documentation 

     

    Various key documents, which provide an overview of the proposal can be viewed and/or download below. Please be aware some of these documents are quite large and may take sometime to open / download on certain computers:

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  • Bow Liveable Streets Engagement

    Created by Alex Jenkins // 1 thread

    From the consultation website:
    https://www.pclconsult.co.uk/liveablestreetsbow/

    The Liveable Streets programme is part of the Love Your Neighbourhood initiative which aims to improve the area for all by making changes to the street infrastructure. By reallocating road space to walking, cycling and public transport, the scheme will encourage changes in travel behaviour which will help to improve people’s health and well being. The scheme also aims to restrict rat running to improve the safety of residential streets.

    Over a 4-year period, 17 areas across the borough have been identified for the scheme. The image below shows the different areas and phases of the scheme. Liveable Streets Bow is one of the schemes in the first phase of the project.

    We would like to hear what is important to you and the changes you think should be made to encourage more walking, cycling and public transport use in Bow.

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  • Redbridge LIP

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    The Local Implementation Plan (LIP) sits underneath the Local Plan and sets out our commitments to make the changes outlined in the Local Plan a reality.

    This LIP also identifies how the London Borough of Redbridge will work with Transport for London (TfL) towards achieving the Mayor's Transport Strategy goals of:

    • Healthy Streets and healthy people
    • A good public transport experience
    • New homes and jobs

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  • Hackney - Isle of Dogs cycle route

    Created by Simon Munk // 2 threads

    This 7.5km route would stretch from Hackney to the Isle of Dogs via Westferry, Mile End and Victoria Park. It would connect with the cycle routes between Stratford and Aldgate and Barking to Tower Hill, as well as the proposed Rotherhithe to Canary Wharf crossing. There are currently two options in Hackney we want your views on.

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  • Proposals for the Creation of a Major Road Network (London)

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    From the DfT:
    As part of the Transport Investment Strategy, the government committed to creating a Major Road Network (MRN).

    This consultation asks for views on:
    how to define the MRN
    the role that local, regional and national bodies will play in the MRN investment programme
    which schemes will be eligible for MRN funding

    A new MRN would help deliver the following objectives:
    reduce congestion
    support economic growth and rebalancing
    support housing delivery
    support all road users
    support the Strategic Road Network

    The creation of an MRN will allow for dedicated funding from the National Roads Fund to be used to improve this middle tier of our busiest and most economically important local authority ‘A’ roads.

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  • Ilford Garden junction

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Redbridge council says:

    The Ilford Garden Junction is located at the junction of the A118 Romford Road and the A406 North Circular Road, adjacent to the River Roding, on the boundary between the boroughs of Newham and Redbridge.
    The location of the junction is a cavernous and much unloved area with poor air quality which acts as a physical and perceptual barrier to those wishing to walk, cycle and drive between key destinations and across the borough boundary.
    The London Boroughs of Redbridge and Newham have been awarded funding from the Mayor’s Air Quality Fund. We are proposing to use this money to make a number of changes to the junction to improve the experience of those who are walking or cycling through the junction. We would like to hear your views and suggestions for our proposals at the Ilford Garden Junction.

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  • Canary Wharf South Dock Bridge consultation

    Created by Alex Jenkins // 1 thread

    The Tower Hamlets consultation page states "We are consulting on a proposed new pedestrian and cycle bridge to connect Canary Wharf and the Isle of Dogs, called South Dock Bridge. An earlier study has shown that the bridge should align with Upper Bank Street on the north bank of the South Dock and the Berkeley Homes 'South Quay Plaza' scheme on the south bank."

    Consultation closes 23 March.

    Link here: https://www.towerhamlets.gov.uk/lgnl/council_and_democracy/consultations/South_Dock_Bridge_consultation.aspx#ad-image-0

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  • New London Plan 2017

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London.gov.uk says:

    What is the new London Plan?
    The London Plan is one of the most important documents for this city.
    It's a strategic plan which shapes how London evolves and develops. All planning decisions should follow London Plan policies, and it sets a policy framework for local plans across London.
    The current 2016 consolidation Plan is still the adopted Development Plan. However the Draft London Plan is a material consideration in planning decisions. It gains more weight as it moves through the process to adoption, however the weight given to it is a matter for the decision maker.

    Consultation on the draft London Plan
    Consultation on this plan is open. Comments will be publicly available. After the consultation, comments are reviewed by an inspector and you may be called in to discuss comments at the Examination in Public.

    What is an Examination in Public?
    At the end of the consultation period your comments will be reviewed by the independent Planning Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State to carry out the Examination in Public for the London Plan.
    You may be invited to discuss your comments at the Examination in Public. All comments will be made available to the public at the end of the consultation period. The legal provisions for the London Plan are in Part VIII of the Greater London Authority (GLA) Act 1999 (as amended) in sections 334 to 341. The Examination in Public is covered in Section 338.

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  • Heavy Goods Vehicles Safety Standard Permit /Direct Vision Standard

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Tfl says:

    We have undertaken research that shows that in 2015, Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) were involved in disproportionately high numbers of fatal collisions with cyclists (78 per cent) and pedestrians (20 per cent) on London’s streets, despite only making up four per cent of the overall miles driven in the Capital. The Direct Vision Standard (DVS) forms part of The Mayor, Sadiq Khan and TfL’s Vision Zero approach to reducing road danger. The DVS categorises HGVs on the level of the driver’s direct vision from the cab.

    We consulted earlier this year on the principles of a new DVS. Listening to the feedback from this consultation and working closely with industry and stakeholders we have now further developed this scheme. The Consultation report and Responses to Issues Raised document from this first phase of consultation are available to view in from the links at the bottom of this text. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    We are now seeking your views on proposals to introduce a new Safety Standard Permit Scheme as part of DVS which widens our approach beyond direct vision and includes a safe system approach to allow us to address a broader range of road danger risks.

    The proposed scheme would require all HGVs over 12 tonnes to hold a Safety Permit to operate in Greater London from 2020. HGVs will be given a rating between ‘zero-star’ (lowest) and ‘five-star’ (highest). Only those vehicles rated ‘one star’ and above would be allowed to enter of operate in London from 2020. Zero rated vehicles would only be allowed if they can prove compliance through safe system measures. By 2024 only ‘three-star’ rated HGVs and above would automatically be given a Safety Permit. HGVs rated two star and below would need to demonstrate increased safety through progressive safe system measures.

    The safe system could include specific industry recognised measures such as sensors, visual warnings and comprehensive driver training. The Safety Standard Permit scheme would evolve over time, taking into account advances in technology.

    Detailed information about the scheme and the approach in which we have arrived at our current proposals are set out in the consultation document. A full Integrated Impact Assessment is also included.

    The consultation approach
    We are undertaking a phased consultation approach at key stages of the development of the consultation proposals to implement the Direct Vision Standard:

    Phase 1 (24 January to 18 April 2017) – we set out the case for HGV driver direct vision and consulted on the Mayor of London’s outline proposals to introduce a Direct Vision Standard for HGVs in London and the principles of the Standard itself. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    Phase 2a – policy consultation (this consultation) – this current phase of consultation seeks views and feedback on the scheme proposals as outlined above and within the supporting consultation document which includes supporting technical reports including the full Integrated Impact Assessment. Feedback from this phase of consultation will be used to develop a second IIA and finalise the scheme proposals to be included in phase 2b of the consultation.

    Phase 2b - Final scheme proposals and statutory consultation (Spring/Summer 2018) – this final phase will consult on the final proposals for the HGV Safety Standard Permit Scheme, including statutory consultation on the appropriate regulatory measure to ban or restrict HGVs in London under the scheme, subject to UK Government and European Commission support and notification.

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  • London Assembly cycling infrastructure investigation

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    Over recent years, TfL policy has increasingly focused on the construction of physical cycling infrastructure on London’s roads. A change in direction towards more segregated infrastructure followed our report in 2012 recommending this approach.

    Our investigation will cover the full range of cycling infrastructure in London, with a particular focus on:

    Cycle Superhighways: a form of cycle lane, designed to make cycling safer by helping keep cyclists away from general traffic, and offer direct and continuous cycling on major routes.

    Quietways: a network of cycle routes that link key destinations, improving safety and convenience through small-scale interventions.

    Mini-Hollands: TfL schemes to invest neighbourhood-level improvements in walking and cycling, involving a range of interventions in each area.

    Cycle parking: provision of parking spaces on-street, at stations or in dedicated parking facilities.

    It is important that TfL is able to establish the effectiveness of the infrastructure it installs on London’s roads. We are concerned that to date there has been no comprehensive study of the new infrastructure’s impact on cycling safety, modal share and other road users.

    Questions to answer:

    1. What progress on new cycling infrastructure has been made under Sadiq Khan, and what are his long-term plans?
    2. Has TfL resolved the problems that delayed some cycling schemes under the previous Mayor?
    3. Has segregation delivered the anticipated benefits on the Cycle Superhighways? How many cyclists are using these routes?
    4. To what extent has segregation had negative consequences for other road users and, if necessary, how can this be mitigated?
    5. Have Quietways delivered their anticipated benefits? How many cyclists are using them?
    6. What are the differences in infrastructure between inner and outer London? How can TfL ensure infrastructure in different areas is sufficient and appropriate to the location?
    7. How will TfL’s new ‘Strategic Cycling Analysis’ help determine where and how to invest in infrastructure?
    8. How appropriate is the 400-metre target set in the draft Transport Strategy? Can we equate proximity with access?
    9. Is TfL’s approach to public engagement working effectively to improve scheme designs and meet stakeholder needs?
    10. Are Londoners sufficiently aware of the cycling infrastructure available to them, and how can awareness be increased?
    11. How is TfL using infrastructure to attract a more diverse range of people to cycle in London?
    12. Is there sufficient cycle parking in London, and is it in the right locations?
    13. How are the lessons of the Mini-Hollands and other previous cycling schemes being applied elsewhere?
    14. Should cycling infrastructure be oriented toward longer-distance commuting journeys, or more localised trips?

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  • London Assembly investigation: Walking & Cycling at Outer London Junctions

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    What different approaches could TfL and London boroughs take to improve junctions and increase walking and cycling in Outer London?

    Small pockets of improvement don’t change the fact that most London streets are dominated by traffic and noise. They are hostile places even to step out into for a pint of milk.

    On behalf of the London Assembly Transport Committee, Caroline Russell AM is investigating how our streets and junctions can become more people-friendly.

    Get involved
    There are a number of specific questions the Committee is seeking to answer. Please address any questions where you have relevant views and information to share, and feel free to cover any other issues you would like the Committee to consider.

    Are there lessons to be learned from previous junction improvements?

    How can we enable more people to walk and cycle?

    How can we make our streets and junctions less hostile to people getting around by bike and on foot?

    How do you get all road users on board?

    Please email transportcommittee@london.gov.uk by August 11 and share the investigation on Twitter using #OuterLondonJunctions

    Key Facts
    The Mayor and TfL are promoting walking and cycling as a form of active travel and a way to reduce health inequalities - however, currently, over 40 percent of Londoners fall short of the recommended 150 minutes of activity per week.

    TfL research has found that people who live in Outer London tend to walk less than those who live in Inner London. Public transport coverage is lower and car ownership is higher in Outer London, with cars making up a larger share of journeys. In particular, people who live in Outer London are less likely to walk children to school, walk to see friends or relatives, and walk to pubs, restaurants and cinemas.

    In 2015:
    53 percent of Inner Londoners walked at least five journeys a week, compared to 35 percent of Outer Londoners
    47 percent of Inner Londoners walked as part of longer journeys on other forms of transport at least five times a week, compared to 41 percent of Outer Londoners

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  • London Assembly Transport Committee Bus network design, safety

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly said:
    "Buses are the busiest form of public transport in London. The city has 675 bus routes, with around 9,000 buses in operation and over 19,000 bus stops. Approximately 2.5 billion bus passenger trips are made every year, around double the number made on London Underground.
    "TfL commissions private operators to run bus services in London, awarding seven-year contracts to operate bus routes. Although bus safety (in terms of casualty numbers) has improved over recent years, there was a spike in bus collision fatalities in 2015.
    "The London Assembly Transport Committee is investigating two aspects of bus services in London: Network Design and Safety."

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  • Mayor's Transport Strategy

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Draft Mayor's Transport Strategy 2017
    On June 21 Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, published a draft of the Mayor's Transport Strategy. The document sets out the Mayor’s policies and proposals to reshape transport in London over the next 25 years.

    About the strategy

    Transport has the potential to shape London, from the streets Londoners live, work and spend time on, to the Tube, rail and bus services they use every day.

    By using the Healthy Streets Approach to prioritise human health and experience in planning the city, the Mayor wants to change London’s transport mix so the city works better for everyone.

    Three key themes are at the heart of the strategy.

    1. Healthy Streets and healthy people
    Creating streets and street networks that encourage walking, cycling and public transport use will reduce car dependency and the health problems it creates.

    2. A good public transport experience
    Public transport is the most efficient way for people to travel over distances that are too long to walk or cycle, and a shift from private car to public transport could dramatically reduce the number of vehicles on London’s streets.

    3. New homes and jobs
    More people than ever want to live and work in London. Planning the city around walking, cycling and public transport use will unlock growth in new areas and ensure that London grows in a way that benefits everyone.

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  • Tower Hamlets Local Infrastructure Fund consultation

    Created by Alex Jenkins // 1 thread

    The council is consulting on the Local Infrastructure Fund (LIF) to give local people a say in defining the infrastructure priorities for their areas.

    The consultation period will run for six weeks from 27 June 2017 to 8 August 2017.

    Tower Hamlets has grown rapidly in recent years, and a number of new housing and employment developments have been built across the borough. Additional growth is expected in the future and the council recognises that this can put pressure on local services and infrastructure - that is, on areas like transport, schools, healthcare facilities and parks/open spaces.

    To deal with the impacts, developers are required to pay a financial contribution called the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL). The borough has apportioned to each LIF Area, 25 per cent of the money from which the income was generated. Please refer to the LIF Area Profile documents for the specific amounts collected so far for each LIF Area. The council must then use this money to support the development of the local area, by addressing the demands that development places on the area, and by making sure the right infrastructure and services are in place for residents.

    In addition to understanding local people’s infrastructure priorities, the council is engaging with local people and giving them an opportunity to nominate projects that they would like to see delivered in their neighborhood. These can be new or existing projects already identified by the council in the LIF Area Profiles. Prior to the allocation of funding to any project and in line with the regulations, you will need to clearly demonstrate how the project will deliver the provision, improvement, replacement, operation and/or maintenance of infrastructure or anything else that is concerned with addressing the demands that development places on an area.

    This consultation provides local people with an opportunity to nominate up to three (new or existing) projects. Prior to the allocation of the funding to any project and in line with the regulations it will need to be clearly demonstrated how the project will deliver the provision, improvement, replacement, operation or maintenance of infrastructure or provides anything else that is concerned with addressing the demands that development places on an area.

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  • Charlton Riverside Formal Consultation

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Greenwich Council says:
    We want to know your initial views on the draft master plan for Charlton Riverside. Please read the public consultation document and associated documents attached to this listing.
    Description:
    The Council is preparing a new planning policy document. This document will support the existing Core Strategy policies and provide additional detail on the future of Charlton Riverside.
    Royal Greenwich is committed to the regeneration of Charlton Riverside and the creation of a new, sustainable neighbourhood providing both jobs and homes in a balanced way.

    This materplan includes Woolwich Road and a potential parallel new road.

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  • Bromley-by-Bow and Marshgate Lane

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    From TfL:

    Overview
    We are working with the London Boroughs of Tower Hamlets and Newham and the London Legacy Development Corporation to enhance the transport links and public realm at Bromley-by-Bow and Marshgate Lane. The proposals would make it easier for people to cross both the A12 and Stratford High Street by providing new or upgraded pedestrian and cycle facilities, improving access for vehicles, enabling new bus routings, encouraging more walking and cycling, and connecting local communities and new developments in the surrounding area.

    What are we proposing?
    We would like your views on our initial ideas to change the road layout at Bromley-by-Bow and Marshgate Lane.

    Bromley-by-Bow
    Two signalised junctions on the A12, to the north of Bromley-by-Bow station, would provide access to proposed residential and commercial development to the east of the A12
    Vehicles travelling northbound on the A12 would be able to turn right to access these new developments directly, without having to make a u-turn at Bow roundabout
    A bus-only link across the A12 would connect Bromley-by-Bow and new developments to the east
    Signalised crossings, replacing the existing subway at Three Mill Lane, and improvements to the subway at Bromley-by-Bow station would make crossing the A12 easier and more accessible for pedestrians and cyclists
    The proposals would also give west Bromley-by-Bow better links to the open space around the River Lea, the Lea River Park & Leaway, and the Three Mills historic buildings and park
    A segregated cycle track on the east side of the A12 would help improve access to the local cycle network, including the Lea Valley Towpath and Cycle Superhighway 2

    Marshgate Lane
    A new link road, connecting Marshgate Lane with Sugarhouse Lane and creating a four-arm junction with A118 Stratford High Street, would allow buses, cyclists and pedestrians to cross the Bow Back River via a new bridge, improving access to Pudding Mill Lane station and the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

    Enabling future bus changes
    In addition to making the area more accessible for pedestrians and cyclists, the proposals for Bromley-by-Bow and Marshgate Lane would enable the creation of a new bus link. This would run from the west of the A12 at Bromley-by-Bow, through new developments either side of the River Lea, and north to the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. Any potential changes to bus routes in the area would be subject to a future and separate consultation.

    Traffic impacts
    Should we decide to take the proposals forward to the next stage of design, we would undertake traffic modelling to understand any potential effects of the changes, and summarises the results as part of a further stage of consultation on detailed proposals.

    Why are we proposing this?
    Bow and the wider area are changing. Local regeneration, growth in housing and the legacy development of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park are all expected to contribute to changing demands on the transport network. Our key aims for the area are:

    Making the A12 Blackwall Tunnel Northern Approach easier to cross. People prefer being able to cross streets at their convenience. Fast-moving or heavy traffic can make this difficult
    Supporting growth and local businesses by providing better access to new developments, encouraging more walking and cycling, and connecting communities
    Creating a more liveable place. People are more likely to use our streets when their journey is interesting and stimulating, with attractive views, buildings, planting, and where other people are using the street

    Bow Interchange
    In spring 2015 we consulted on improvements to make it easier for pedestrians to cross Bow Interchange safely and provide a new area of public space. Seven new signalised crossings, including two pedestrian/cycle crossings, were opened in June 2016, improving connectivity between Bow and Stratford. You can find more information on the 2015 consultation at: tfl.gov.uk/roads/bow-vision

    We have looked at further options to redesign Bow Interchange and remove both the roundabout and flyover, giving pedestrians and cyclists more direct access to facilities. However, we have now deferred development of this scheme until we can identify the significant funding required to take the plans forward.

    Public exhibitions
    We will be holding the following public exhibitions, where you can view the proposals, speak to members of the project team and submit your response to the consultation:

    Kingsley Hall, Powis Road, London E3 3HJ

    TBC
    Saturday 8 April, 1200-1600
    Thursday 20 April, 1600-2000

    The Vision for Bow and the Healthy Streets Approach
    The pedestrian improvements at Bow Interchange were delivered as part of the Vision for Bow: a place which all road users, passing through, find accessible, safe and connected. You can find more information on the Vision for Bow at tfl.gov.uk/roads/bow-vision

    Announced in February 2017, the Healthy Streets Approach incorporates the objectives and principles of the Vision for Bow. We will therefore deliver the proposals at Bromley-by-Bow and Marshgate Lane as part of this approach, which sets out a long-term plan for improving Londoners’ and visitors’ experiences of our streets, helping everyone to be more active and enjoy the health benefits of being on our streets. You can find more information on the Healthy Streets Approach at tfl.gov.uk/healthy-streets

    Other developments in the Bow area
    The overview map above includes proposals for road layout changes in the Bow area that would be delivered by organisations other than Transport for London. We have included these to show how our proposals fit in to the wider regeneration of the Bow area. These changes are included in the Bromley-by-Bow and Pudding Mill Supplementary Planning Documents, which were consulted on by the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC) in winter 2016. Details of these consultations can be found below.

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  • Monier Road H14 Olympic Park bridge

    Created by Simon Munk // 2 threads

    This is a motor vehicle bridge planned to replace the current cycle/walking bridge from Fish Island to the Olympic Park.

    LLDC said:

    "Bridges H14 and H16 both span the River Lee Navigation and will connect Fish Island to the Sweetwater neighbourhood planned within PDZ4. Under the LCS permission, outline approval was granted for:
    - Bridge H14: A new all-modes bridge (including a vehicular route) connecting Sweetwater to Roach Road/Monier Road.
    - Bridge H16: A new pedestrian and cycle bridge connecting Sweetwater to Stour Road.

    The new all-modes H14 will replace the existing pedestrian and cycle bridge that currently crosses the River Lee Navigation at the same location.
    Condition LCS0.31 of the LCS outline planning permission specifies the information to be provided with RMAs for both Bridges H14 and H16. Table A1 in Appendix A to this Covering
    Letter details how the requirements of Condition LCS0.31 have been met. Appendix A also notes any other relevant LCS planning conditions (Table A2) that are addressed by the RMAs.
    The description of development for the purposes of the Bridge H14 RMA is as follows: “Application for the approval of reserved matters for Bridge H14 with associated works pursuant to condition LCS0.31 of outline planning permission 11/90621/OUTODA being details of layout, scale, appearance, means of access and landscape.”
    The description of development for the purposes of the Bridge H16 RMA is as follows: “Application for the approval of reserved matters for Bridge H16 with associated works pursuant to condition LCS0.31 of outline planning permission 11/90621/OUTODA being details of layout, scale, appearance, means of access and landscape.”

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